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From Papers to Practices: District Level Priority Setting Processes and Criteria for Family Planning, Maternal, Newborn and Child Health Interventions in Tanzania.

Chitama, D., Baltussen, R., Ketting, E., Kamazima, S., Nswilla, A. and Mujinja, P. G. M. (2011) From Papers to Practices: District Level Priority Setting Processes and Criteria for Family Planning, Maternal, Newborn and Child Health Interventions in Tanzania. BMC women's health, 11. p. 46. ISSN 1472-6874

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Abstract

Successful priority setting is increasingly known to be an important aspect in achieving better family planning, maternal, newborn and child health (FMNCH) outcomes in developing countries. However, far too little attention has been paid to capturing and analysing the priority setting processes and criteria for FMNCH at district level. This paper seeks to capture and analyse the priority setting processes and criteria for FMNCH at district level in Tanzania. Specifically, we assess the FMNCH actor's engagement and understanding, the criteria used in decision making and the way criteria are identified, the information or evidence and tools used to prioritize FMNCH interventions at district level in Tanzania. We conducted an exploratory study mixing both qualitative and quantitative methods to capture and analyse the priority setting for FMNCH at district level, and identify the criteria for priority setting. We purposively sampled the participants to be included in the study. We collected the data using the nominal group technique (NGT), in-depth interviews (IDIs) with key informants and documentary review. We analysed the collected data using both content analysis for qualitative data and correlation analysis for quantitative data. We found a number of shortfalls in the district's priority setting processes and criteria which may lead to inefficient and unfair priority setting decisions in FMNCH. In addition, participants identified the priority setting criteria and established the perceived relative importance of the identified criteria. However, we noted differences exist in judging the relative importance attached to the criteria by different stakeholders in the districts. In Tanzania, FMNCH contents in both general development policies and sector policies are well articulated. However, the current priority setting process for FMNCH at district levels are wanting in several aspects rendering the priority setting process for FMNCH inefficient and unfair (or unsuccessful). To improve district level priority setting process for the FMNCH interventions, we recommend a fundamental revision of the current FMNCH interventions priority setting process. The improvement strategy should utilize rigorous research methods combining both normative and empirical methods to further analyze and correct past problems at the same time use the good practices to improve the current priority setting process for FMNCH interventions. The suggested improvements might give room for efficient and fair (or successful) priority setting process for FMNCH interventions.

Item Type: Article
Keywords: District Level Priority, Family Planning, Maternal, Newborn, Child Health, Child health, Interventions, Tanzania
Subjects: Maternal & Neonatal Health > Maternal Mortality & Morbidity
Maternal & Neonatal Health > Neonatal Health
Sexual & Reproductive Health > Family Planning
Divisions: Other
Depositing User: Mr Joseph Madata
Date Deposited: 15 Aug 2013 08:53
Last Modified: 15 Aug 2013 08:53
URI: http://ihi.eprints.org/id/eprint/1665

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