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Correlates of and Barriers to the Utilization of Health Services for Delivery in South Asia and Sub-Saharan Africa.

Tey, N.-P. and Lai, S.-l. (2013) Correlates of and Barriers to the Utilization of Health Services for Delivery in South Asia and Sub-Saharan Africa. TheScientificWorldJournal, 2013. p. 423403. ISSN 1537-744X

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Abstract

The high maternal and neonatal mortality rates in South Asia and Sub-Saharan Africa can be attributed to the lack of access and utilization of health services for delivery. Data from the Demographic and Health Surveys conducted in Bangladesh, India, Pakistan, Kenya, Nigeria, and Tanzania show that more than half of the births in these countries were delivered outside a health facility. Institutional delivery was closely associated with educational level, family wealth, place of residence, and women's media exposure status, but it was not influenced by women's work status and their roles in decision-making (with the exception of Nigeria). Controlling for other variables, higher parity and younger women were less likely to use a health facility for delivery. Within each country, the poorer, less educated and rural women had higher unmet need for maternal care services. Service related factors (accessibility in terms of cost and distance) and sociocultural factors (e.g., did not perceive the need for the services and objections from husband and family) also posed as barriers to institutional delivery. The paper concludes with some suggestions to increase institutional delivery.

Item Type: Article
Keywords: Delivery, Maternal, Neonatal, Mortality Rates, Health facility, , South Asia and Sub-Saharan Africa
Subjects: Health Systems > Quality of Care
Maternal & Neonatal Health > Maternal Mortality & Morbidity
Maternal & Neonatal Health > Neonatal Health
Divisions: Other
Depositing User: Mr Joseph Madata
Date Deposited: 13 Mar 2014 06:43
Last Modified: 13 Mar 2014 06:43
URI: http://ihi.eprints.org/id/eprint/2537

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