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Factors Affecting Providers' Delivery of Intermittent Preventive Treatment for Malaria in Pregnancy: A Five-country Analysis of National Service Provision Assessment Surveys.

Maheu-Giroux, M. and Castro, M. C. (2014) Factors Affecting Providers' Delivery of Intermittent Preventive Treatment for Malaria in Pregnancy: A Five-country Analysis of National Service Provision Assessment Surveys. Malaria journal, 13 (1). p. 440. ISSN 1475-2875

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Abstract

Intermittent preventive treatment in pregnancy (IPTp) delivered during antenatal care (ANC) visits has been shown to be a highly efficacious and cost-effective intervention. Given the high rates of ANC attendance in sub-Saharan Africa, the current low IPTp coverage represents considerable missed opportunities. The objective of this study was to explore factors affecting provider's delivery of IPTp during ANC consultations. Data from five nationally representative service provision assessment surveys informed the statistical analyses (Kenya, Namibia, Rwanda, Tanzania, and Uganda; 2006-2010). Poisson regression models with robust/clustered standard errors were used to estimate the effect of different determinants on IPTp delivery from 4,971 observed ANC consultations. The five major modifiable determinants of IPTp delivery were: 1) user-fees for ANC medicines (relative risk (RR) = 0.76; 95% confidence intervals (95% CI): 0.62-0.93); 2) facilities having IPTp guidelines (RR = 1.12; 95% CI: 1.01-1.24); 3) facilities having implemented IPTp as part of their routine ANC services offering (RR = 4.18; 95% CI: 1.75-10.01); 4) stock-outs of sulphadoxine-pyrimethamine (RR = 0.40; 95% CI: 0.27-0.60); and, 5) providers having received IPTp training (RR = 1.21; 95% CI: 1.09-1.35). Using the population-attributable fraction, it was estimated that addressing these barriers jointly could lead to a 31% increase in delivery of this intervention during ANC consultations. Of these four potentially modifiable determinants, training of providers for IPTp had the largest potential impact. If proved to be cost-effective, dispensing IPTp training to ANC providers should be prioritized. Multifaceted approaches targeted in areas of low coverage and/or type of facilities least likely to provide this intervention should be implemented if the Roll Back Malaria target of 100% IPTp coverage by 2015 is to be attained.

Item Type: Article
Keywords: Malaria, Pregnancy, IPTp, Antenatal care, sub-Saharan Africa
Subjects: Malaria > Diagnosis & treatment
Maternal & Neonatal Health > Neonatal Health
Divisions: Other
Depositing User: Mr Joseph Madata
Date Deposited: 01 Dec 2014 05:33
Last Modified: 01 Dec 2014 05:33
URI: http://ihi.eprints.org/id/eprint/2972

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