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Diabetic Foot: Prevalence, Knowledge, and Foot Self-care Practices among Diabetic Patients in Dar es Salaam, Tanzania - a cross-sectional study.

Chiwanga, F. S. and Njelekela, M. A. (2015) Diabetic Foot: Prevalence, Knowledge, and Foot Self-care Practices among Diabetic Patients in Dar es Salaam, Tanzania - a cross-sectional study. Journal of foot and ankle research, 8. p. 20. ISSN 1757-1146

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Abstract

At the time of diagnosis, more than 10 % of people with type 2 diabetes mellitus have one or two risk factors for a foot ulceration and a lifetime risk of 15 %. Diabetic foot ulcers can be prevented through well-coordinated foot care services. The objective of this study was to determine knowledge of foot care and reported practice of foot self-care among diabetic patients with the aim of identifying and addressing barriers to preventing amputations among diabetic patients. Patients were randomly selected from all public diabetic clinics in Dar es Salaam. A questionnaire containing knowledge and foot care practice questions was administered to all study participants. A detailed foot examination was performed on all patients, with the results categorized according to the International Diabetes Federation foot risk categories. Statistics were performed using SPSS version 14. Of 404 patients included in this study, 15 % had foot ulcers, 44 % had peripheral neuropathy, and 15 % had peripheral vascular disease. In multivariate analysis, peripheral neuropathy and insulin treatment were significantly associated with presence of foot ulcer. The mean knowledge score was 11.2 ± 6.4 out of a total possible score of 23. Low mean scores were associated with lack of formal education (8.3 ± 6.1), diabetes duration of < 5 years (10.2 ± 6.7) and not receiving advice on foot care (8.0 ± 6.1). Among the 404 patients, 48 % had received advice on foot care, and 27.5 % had their feet examined by a doctor at least once since their initial diagnosis. Foot self-care was significantly higher in patients who had received advice on foot care and in those whose feet had been examined by a doctor at least once. The prevalence of diabetic foot is high among patients attending public clinics in Dar es Salaam. There is an urgent need to establish coordinated foot care services within the diabetic clinic to identify feet at risk, institute early management, and provide continuous foot care education to patients and health care providers.

Item Type: Article
Keywords: Diabetes, Diabetic foot, Foot care
Subjects: Non-communicable disease (NCD) > Diabetes
Divisions: Muhimbili University of Health and Allied Sciences (MUHAS)
Depositing User: Mr Joseph Madata
Date Deposited: 20 Aug 2015 06:21
Last Modified: 20 Aug 2015 06:21
URI: http://ihi.eprints.org/id/eprint/3276

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