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A Feasibility Study to Determine if Minimally Trained Medical Students Can Identify Markers of Chronic Parasitic Infection using Bedside Ultrasound in Rural Tanzania.

Barsky, M., Kushner, L., Ansbro, M., Bowman, K., Sassounian, M., Gustafson, K., Lahham, S., Joseph, L. and Fox, J. C. (2015) A Feasibility Study to Determine if Minimally Trained Medical Students Can Identify Markers of Chronic Parasitic Infection using Bedside Ultrasound in Rural Tanzania. World journal of emergency medicine, 6 (4). pp. 293-8. ISSN 1920-8642

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Abstract

Parasitic infections pose a significant health risk in developing nations and are a major cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide. In the Republic of Tanzania, the CDC estimates that 51.5% of the population is infected with one or more intestinal parasites. If diagnosed early, the consequences of chronic parasitic infection can potentially be avoided. Six first-year medical students were recruited to enroll patients in the study. They underwent ten hours of formal, hands-on, ultrasound which included basic cardiac, hepatobiliary, renal, pulmonary and FAST scan ultrasound. A World Health Organization protocol with published grading scales was adapted and used to assess for pathology in each patient's liver, bladder, kidneys, and spleen. A total of 59 patients were enrolled in the study. Students reported a sensitivity of 96% and specificity of 100% for the presence of a dome shaped bladder, a sensitivity and specificity of 100% for bladder thickening, a sensitivity and specificity of 100% for portal hypertension and ascites. The sensitivity was 81% with a specificity of 100% for presence of portal vein distention. The sensitivity was 100% with a specificity of 90% for dilated bowel. Ultrasound has shown a promise at helping to identify pathology in rural communities with limited resources such as Tanzania. Our data suggest that minimally trained first year medical students are able to perform basic ultrasound scans that can identify ultrasonographic markers of parasitic infections.

Item Type: Article
Keywords: infection, mortality, intestinal parasites, Computed tomography, Tanzania
Subjects: Emerging and Re-emerging Infectious Diseases
Divisions: Other
Depositing User: Mr Joseph Madata
Date Deposited: 13 Jan 2016 08:40
Last Modified: 13 Jan 2016 08:40
URI: http://ihi.eprints.org/id/eprint/3526

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