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Can Training Non-physician Clinicians/associate Clinicians (NPCs/ACs) in Emergency Obstetric, Neonatal Care and Clinical Leadership Make a Difference to Practice and Help Towards Reductions in Maternal and Neonatal Mortality in Rural Tanzania? The ETATMBA Project

Ellard, D. R., Shemdoe, A., Mazuguni, F., Mbaruku, G., Kihaile, P., Pemba, S., Bergström, S., Nyamtema, A., Mohamed, H.-M. and O’Hare, J. P. (2015) Can Training Non-physician Clinicians/associate Clinicians (NPCs/ACs) in Emergency Obstetric, Neonatal Care and Clinical Leadership Make a Difference to Practice and Help Towards Reductions in Maternal and Neonatal Mortality in Rural Tanzania? The ETATMBA Project. BMJ. ISSN 0959-8138

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Abstract

During late 2010, 36 trainees including 19 assistant medical officers (AMOs) 1 senior clinical officer (CO) and 16 nurse midwives/nurses were recruited from districts across rural Tanzania and invited to join the Enhancing Human Resources and Use of Appropriate Technologies for Maternal and Perinatal Survival in the sub-Saharan Africa (ETATMBA) training programme. The ETATMBA project was training associate clinicians (ACs) as advanced clinical leaders in emergency obstetric care. The trainees returned to health facilities across the country with the hope of being able to apply their new skills and knowledge. The main aim of this study was to explore the impact of the ETATMBA training on health outcomes including maternal and neonatal morbidity and mortality in their facilities. Secondly, to explore the challenges faced in working in these health facilities. The study is a pre-examination/postexamination of maternal and neonatal health indicators and a survey of health facilities in rural Tanzania. The facilities surveyed were those in which ETATMBA trainees were placed post-training. The maternal and neonatal indicators were collected for 2011 and 2013 and the survey of the facilities was in early 2014. 16 of 17 facilities were surveyed. Maternal deaths show a non-significant downward trend over the 2 years (282–232 cases/100 000 live births). There were no significant differences in maternal, neonatal and birth complication variables across the time-points. The survey of facilities revealed shortages in key areas and some are a serious concern. This study represents a snapshot of rural health facilities providing maternal and neonatal care in Tanzania. Enhancing knowledge, practical skills, and clinical leadership of ACs may have a positive impact on health outcomes. However, any impact may be confounded by the significant challenges in delivering a service in terms of resources. Thus, training may be beneficial, but it requires an infrastructure that supports it.

Item Type: Article
Keywords: Non-physician,physician, clinicians, Obstetric, Neonatal care, Clinical leadership, Maternal and Neonatal Mortality, ETATMBA, Tanzania
Subjects: Health Systems > Quality of Care
Health Systems > Human Resources
Maternal & Neonatal Health > Maternal Mortality & Morbidity
Maternal & Neonatal Health > Neonatal Health
Divisions: Ifakara Health Institute > Health Systems
Depositing User: Mr Joseph Madata
Date Deposited: 25 Feb 2016 06:26
Last Modified: 25 Feb 2016 06:26
URI: http://ihi.eprints.org/id/eprint/3634

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