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School Distribution as Keep-Up Strategy to Maintain Universal Coverage of Long-Lasting Insecticidal Nets: Implementation and Results of a Program in Southern Tanzania.

Lalji, S., Ngondi, J. M., Thawer, N. G., Tembo, A., Mandike, R., Mohamed, A., Chacky, F., Mwalimu, C. D., Greer, G., Kaspar, N., Kramer, K., Mlay, B., Issa, K., Lweikiza, J., Mutafungwa, A., Nzowa, M., Willilo, R. A., Nyoni, W., Dadi, D., Ramsan, M. M., Reithinger, R. and Magesa, S. M. (2016) School Distribution as Keep-Up Strategy to Maintain Universal Coverage of Long-Lasting Insecticidal Nets: Implementation and Results of a Program in Southern Tanzania. Global health, science and practice, 4 (2). pp. 251-63. ISSN 2169-575X

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Abstract

Tanzania successfully scaled up coverage of long-lasting insecticidal nets (LLINs) through mass campaigns. To sustain these gains, a school-based approach was piloted in the country's Southern Zone starting in 2013, called the School Net Program 1 (SNP1). We report on the design, implementation, monitoring, and outputs of the second round (SNP2) undertaken in 2014. SNP2 was conducted in all schools in Lindi, Mtwara, and Ruvuma regions, targeting students in primary (Standards 1, 3, 5, and 7) and secondary (Forms 2 and 4) schools and all teachers. In Lindi region, 2 additional classes (Standards 2 and 4) were targeted. LLIN distribution data were managed using an Android software application called SchoolNet. SNP2 included 2,337 schools, 473,700 students, and 25,269 teachers. A total of 5,070 people were trained in LLIN distribution (487 trainers and 4,583 distributors), and 4,392 (434 ward and 3,958 village) community change agents undertook sensitization and mobilization. A total of 507,775 LLINs were distributed to schools, with 464,510 (97.9% of those registered) students and 24,206 (95.8% of those registered) school teachers receiving LLINs. LLIN ownership and use is expected to have increased, potentially further reducing the burden of malaria in the Southern Zone of Tanzania.

Item Type: Article
Keywords: School Net Program, Long-Lasting Insecticidal Nets, Malaria, Southern Tanzania
Subjects: Malaria > Vector control
Divisions: Other
Depositing User: Mr Joseph Madata
Date Deposited: 04 Aug 2016 11:21
Last Modified: 04 Aug 2016 11:21
URI: http://ihi.eprints.org/id/eprint/3868

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